Topic outline

  • Section 1. Course Introduction

    Welcome – To proceed though the course use the Navigation bar on the left. Click on  “Section 1” to start.

    Course Introduction

    Eating a plant-based vegetarian or vegan diet can be a healthy, exciting alternative to traditional meat-based meal planning. According to the National Institutes of Health, vegetarian diets are growing more and more common and by some estimates, about 2% of the U.S. adult population follows this type of diet.

    This course is designed to provide Performance Competencies simulating real-life practice examples and Meal Planning considerations that you may encounter when working with your clients that are interested in a Vegetarian Meal Plan.

    Video Lecture #1 - Course Introduction

    Author: Sharon Richmond - MBA, RD, LDN, CLT

    Course Objectives

    At the conclusion of this program the dietetic professional will be able to:  

    1. Identify the different types of vegetarian diets
    2. Describe the reasons for choosing a vegetarian diet
    3. Identify the demographic appeal of a vegetarian diet
    4. Discuss the health benefits of a vegetarian diet
    5. Explain dietary recommendations and considerations
    6. Case Study - Practice Illustration Examples

      1. Case Study #1 - Stanley K. - Weight Loss Objective
      2. Case Study #2 - Karen L. - Maintaining a Healthy Diet


    Course Completion Requirements

    To complete this course you must read the course content and successfully complete the Case Studies in the following sections:

    Section 5: Case Study #1 – Stanley K. – Weight Loss

    Section 6: Case Study #2 – Karen L. – Maintaining a Healthy Diet

  • Section 2. Types of Vegetarians

    Video Lecture #2 - Types of Vegetarians and Demographics


    Types of Vegetarians

    Eating a plant-based vegetarian or vegan diet can be a healthy, exciting alternative to traditional meat-based meal planning. There are many types of vegetarians. Some eat fish and some eat dairy foods, such as cheese and/or eggs while others abstain entirely from any food product that comes from an animal.

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics identifies four different types of vegetarians:1

    1. Strict vegetarian or vegan: A vegetarian diet that rejects all animal products such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, cheese and other dairy products.

    2. Lacto-vegetarian: A vegetarian diet that excludes meat, poultry, fish and eggs but includes dairy products.

    3. Lacto-ovo-vegetarian: A vegetarian diet that excludes meat, poultry and fish but includes eggs and dairy products. Most vegetarians in the United States fall into this category.

    4. Flexitarian: A semi-vegetarian diet with a focus on vegetarian food with occasional meat, poultry, or fish consumption.

    These are people who eat a mostly vegetarian diet, but they occasionally eat meat,” says Jody Engel, a nutritionist and registered dietitian at National Institutes of Health. “They might say ‘I’m a vegetarian, but I need to eat my burgers every Sunday.’  People tend to follow their own rules, which is one reason why it’s hard for researchers to study vegetarians. There’s so much variance.”2

    Another definition of flexitarian is a person who usually eats meat, chicken or fish, but chooses one or more days a week to eat only plant based foods. 

    A fifth type of diet is the Pesce-vegetarian: A vegetarian diet that allows fish. This type of vegetarian is usually found in combination with other types such as lacto or lacto-ovo and is not always listed under the major types of vegetarianism.

    Reasons for Choosing a Vegetarian Diet

    According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics people have many reasons for becoming vegetarians many of which include personal preference, health concerns, dislike for meat or other food from animals, or they believe a plant-based diet is healthier. Some adopt a vegetarian lifestyle for ethical reasons. Many vegetarians, for example, avoid meat because they do not want animals killed or harmed. These individuals may object to the treatment of animals raised on industrial farms.3

    The environment is another concern for some vegetarians. Issues have been cited concerning all aspects of the environment, like animal waste from factory farms polluting the land and water or forests that are cut down to make room for grazing cattle. “Vegetarian diets are also more sustainable and environmentally sound than diets that rely heavily on meat, poultry and fish,” says NIH nutritionist Dr. Susan Krebs-Smith, who monitors trends in cancer risk factors.4

    Another reason some may choose a vegetarian diet is to lose weight.  However, Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. writing for the Mayo Clinic says that a vegetarian diet is not inherently a weight-loss diet, but rather a “lifestyle choice”. A vegetarian diet isn't automatically low calorie. Although a vegetarian diet is generally leaner than those who follow a non vegetarian diet a person can gain weight on a vegetarian diet if their portion sizes are too big or if you eat too many high-calorie foods, such as sweetened beverages and desserts.5

    Some people follow a vegetarian diet for religious reasons. Hinduism and Buddhism teachings hold vegetarianism as an ideal way to promote compassion and non-injury to living creatures.  The Jains believe it is wrong to kill any living being, especially for food. Seventh-Day Adventists follow a vegetarian diet that does allow milk and eggs, but not meat.  This is due to the belief that whatever they eat should preserve the health of the body, mind and spirit.

    Vegetarian Demographics

    Vegetarian meals focus on fruits and vegetables, dried beans, whole grains, seeds and nuts. According to the NIH, vegetarian diets are growing more and more common and by some estimates, about 2% of the U.S. adult population follows this type of diet.6

    In its most recent survey, the Vegetarian Resource Group (VRG) found that men and women were nearly equally likely to be vegetarians, although Vegetarian Times saw a roughly 60/40 split women to men. Women ages 18-34 were more likely to be vegetarian than any other gender-age group, according to VRG and another study by Cultivate Research. Three percent of youth ages 8-18, or an estimated 1.4 million young people, are vegetarian, according to a 2010 VRG poll.7

  • Section 3. Health Benefits and Dietary Recommendations

    Video Lecture #3 - Vegetarian Diet Health Benefits


    Vegetarian Diet Health Benefits

    Many people make the switch to a vegetarian diet because of the potential health benefits. According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, vegetarian eating patterns have been associated with improved health outcomes including lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of heart disease and lower blood pressure.

    A well-planned vegetarian diet can provide good nutrition. It often helps a person to have better health. Eating a vegetarian diet may help:8

    • Reduce the chance of obesity
    • Reduce the risk of heart disease
    • Lower blood pressure
    • Lower the risk of type 2 diabetes

    Compared to non-vegetarians, vegetarians usually eat:

    • Fewer calories from fat (especially saturated fat)
    • Fewer overall calories
    • More fiber, potassium, and vitamin C

    Despite the different definitions for vegetarians, “there’s tremendous agreement among nutrition experts and health organizations that a more plant-based diet is beneficial, whether you’re a true vegetarian or not,” says Dr. Susan Krebs-Smith. “Most Americans don’t eat enough fruit, vegetables, legumes or whole grains. There’s a huge consensus that eating more of these foods would be a good idea for everyone.”9

    Vegetarian diets tend to have fewer calories, lower levels of saturated fat and cholesterol, and more fiber, potassium and vitamin C than other eating patterns. Vegetarians tend to weigh less than meat-eaters, and to have lower cancer rates. “Evidence also suggests that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from certain heart diseases, and that those who follow a vegetarian diet tend to have lower LDL [“bad”] cholesterol levels,” says Jody Engel. 

    In some cases, though, it’s unclear if certain health benefits come from plant-based eating or from the healthy lifestyle of most vegetarians. Dr. Krebs-Smith notes: “Vegetarians are generally more physically active and have healthier habits than non-vegetarians. They also typically have a higher socioeconomic status, at least in the United States”.

    Because vegetarians by definition don’t eat meat, some people jump to the conclusion that simply cutting meat from your diet will lead to health benefits. “But it’s actually more complicated than that,” says Cardiologist Dr. Gary Fraser. “Differences in life expectancy and other health matters might be related to the extra fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes—including soy—that vegetarians tend to eat. You can’t necessarily conclude it’s based on the absence of meat,” he says.

    Experts generally agree that vegetarians who eat a wide variety of foods can readily meet all their body’s needs for nutrients.  However, vegetarians need to be sure they take in enough iron, calcium, zinc and vitamin B12. Studies show that most vegetarians manage to get enough vitamins and minerals, in part because so many cereals, breads and other foods are fortified with these nutrients. “Vegans in particular need to be certain to get enough vitamin B12 and Omega-3 fatty acids,” says Rachel Fisher, a registered dietitian involved in nutrition research at NIH. Omega-3—found in fish, flax seed, walnuts and canola oil—is important for heart health and vision.

    Some vegetarians take dietary supplements to make sure they’re getting everything they need. Rachel Fisher comments “At any stage of life, you should be able to eat a healthy diet by consuming vegetarian foods. But it does take a little planning”.  Whether a person is a vegetarian or not, Fisher says, a person can benefit from the high fiber, low fat and rich nutrients of a vegetarian diet.

    Nutrients to Focus on for Vegetarians 

    Vegetarian diets can meet all the recommendations for nutrients. The NIH dietary recommendation is to consume a variety of foods and the right amount of foods to meet calorie needs that follow the food group recommendations for age, sex, and activity level to get the right amount of food and the variety of foods needed for nutrient adequacy.10

    Certain groups of people may need to plan carefully, such as:11

    • Young children and teens
    • Pregnant or breast-feeding women
    • Older adults
    • People with cancer and some chronic illnesses

    Vegetarian diets that include some dairy products and eggs have all the nutrition that is needed. If they choose to avoid most or all animal foods, pay close attention to make sure they get all of the following nutrients which include protein, iron, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B12.12

    • Protein has many important functions in the body and is essential for growth and maintenance. Protein needs can easily be met by eating a variety of plant-based foods. Don't overload meals with high-fat cheeses to replace the meat. Protein needs can easily be met by eating a variety of plant foods. 

    Combining different protein sources in the same meal is not necessary. Sources of protein for vegetarians and vegans include beans, nuts, nut butters, peas, and soy products (tofu, tempeh, veggie burgers). Milk products and eggs are also good protein sources for lacto-ovo vegetarians.

    • Iron functions primarily as a carrier of oxygen in the blood. Iron sources for vegetarians and vegans include iron-fortified breakfast cereals, spinach, kidney beans, black-eyed peas, lentils, turnip greens, molasses, whole wheat breads, peas, and some dried fruits (dried apricots, prunes, raisins).

    Because of their high nutrient content, consuming beans and peas is recommended for everyone, vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike. Enjoy some vegetarian chili, three bean salad, or split pea soup. Make a hummus filled pita sandwich.

    Eating foods that are high in vitamin C at the same meal as iron-rich foods increases iron absorption. Foods high in vitamin C include, tomatoes, potatoes, citrus fruits, bell peppers, and strawberries.

    • Calcium is used for building bones and teeth and in maintaining bone strength. Sources of calcium for vegetarians and vegans include calcium-fortified soymilk and other non-dairy milks such as almond milk, calcium-fortified breakfast cereals, fortified orange juice, tofu made with calcium sulfate, and some dark-green leafy vegetables (collard greens, turnip greens, bok choy, mustard greens). Calcium-fortified soymilk provides calcium in amounts similar to milk.

    The amount of calcium that can be absorbed from these foods varies. Consuming enough plant foods to meet calcium needs may be unrealistic for many. Milk products are excellent calcium sources for lacto vegetarians. Calcium supplements are another potential source.

    • Zinc is necessary for many biochemical reactions and also helps the immune system function properly. Sources of zinc for vegetarians and vegans include many types of beans (white beans, kidney beans, and chickpeas), zinc-fortified breakfast cereals, wheat germ, and pumpkin seeds. Milk products are a zinc source for lacto vegetarians.


    • Vitamin B12 is only found in animal products and some fortified foods. Vegetarians should choose fortified foods such as cereals, soy products, veggie burgers, and nutritional yeast. Or, take a vitamin B12 supplement if they do not consume any animal products. It is recommended that they check the Nutrition Facts label for vitamin B12 in fortified products. Animal sources of vitamin B12 for lacto-ovo vegetarians include milk products and eggs.


    Additionally, the National Institutes of Health recommendation includes:13

    • Omega-3 fatty acids: Omega-3s are important for heart and brain health. Vegetarians can get Omega-3s from these foods:

      • Fatty fish, such as halibut, mackerel, salmon, herring, and sardines (this only applies to pescetarians and semi-vegetarians)
      • Nuts and seeds, such as walnuts, pumpkin seeds, ground flaxseed, canola oil, chia seeds
      • Soybeans and soy oil
      • Foods fortified with Omega-3s, such as bread, eggs, juice, and milk

    Dietary Recommendations for Vegetarians

    A vegetarian eating pattern can be a healthy option. The key is to consume a variety of foods in the right amounts to meet calorie and nutrient needs.14

    Many foods that typically contain meat or poultry can be made vegetarian. This can increase vegetable intake and cut saturated fat and cholesterol intake. Consider the following options:15 

      • pasta primavera or pasta with marinara or pesto sauce
      • veggie pizza
      • vegetable lasagna
      • tofu-vegetable stir fry
      • vegetable lo mein
      • vegetable kabobs
      • bean burritos or tacos

    A variety of vegetarian products look (and may taste) like their non-vegetarian counterparts, but are usually lower in saturated fat and contain no cholesterol. 

      • For breakfast, try soy-based sausage patties or links.
      • Rather than hamburgers, try veggie burgers. A variety of kinds are available, made with soy beans, vegetables, and/or rice.
      • Add vegetarian meat substitutes to soups and stews to boost protein without adding saturated fat or cholesterol. These include tempeh (cultured soybeans with a chewy texture), tofu, or wheat gluten (seitan).
      • For barbecues, try veggie burgers, soy hot dogs, marinated tofu or tempeh, and veggie kabobs.
      • Make bean burgers, lentil burgers, or pita halves with falafel (spicy ground chick pea patties).
      • Some restaurants offer soy options (texturized vegetable protein) as a substitute for meat, and soy cheese as a substitute for regular cheese.

    • Most restaurants can accommodate vegetarian modifications to menu items by substituting meatless sauces, omitting meat from stir-fries, and adding vegetables or pasta in place of meat. These substitutions are more likely to be available at restaurants that make food to order.

    • Many Asian and Indian restaurants offer a varied selection of vegetarian dishes. 


    Many popular main dishes are or can be vegetarian— such as pasta primavera, pasta with marinara or pesto sauce, veggie pizza, vegetable lasagna, tofu-vegetable stir-fry, and bean burritos.

    Be aware that some foods marketed as vegetarian can be high in calories and fat, such as soy hot dogs, soy cheese, refried beans and snack bars. The basics of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight are the same for all people a healthy diet should balance calories eaten with calories burned.

    Vegetarian Meal Myths and Facts 

    Vegetarian diets can be healthful and nutritionally adequate but there are still many myths regarding vegetarian diets. Five of the most common myths associated with vegetarian diets are discussed in an article by Alexandra Caspero, MA, RD, published by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.16

    Myth #1: Vegetarians and vegans have a hard time getting enough protein.

    Although meat is most commonly associated with protein, plant-based sources of protein are a healthy alternative. These include legumes, soy products, whole grains, and nuts. That's "because protein from whole grains and legumes have lower digestibility than animal protein," says Reed Mangels, PhD, RD.

    Myth #2: To build strong bones, you must include dairy in your diet.

    There are other alternatives to dairy products such as kale, broccoli, bok choy, and fortified soymilk. Fortified foods such as ready-to-eat cereals, orange juice and tofu are other options.

    Myth #3: Consuming soy products increases the risk of breast cancer.

    "Soy doesn't appear to have any effect on risk for breast cancer one way or the other," says Ginny Messina, MPH, RD. In fact, she says, "there is evidence that girls who consume soy in childhood and adolescence have a lower lifetime risk for breast cancer; soy in adulthood doesn't appear to have that effect."

    Myth #4: Vegetarian diets are not appropriate for pregnant women, children or athletes.

    Caspero says “a vegetarian diet can meet the nutrient needs of people from all stages of life, including pregnant and lactating women, children, and even athletes”. A well-planned diet including a diversity of foods can promote normal growth.

    Myth #5: Just because it is vegetarian it is healthy.

    It is recommended that consumers read food labels and look for low levels of saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. “The vegetarian or vegan label doesn't automatically equal good health” says Caspero.

    Even some foods marketed as vegetarian can be high in calories and fat, such as soy hot dogs, soy cheese, refried beans and snack bars.

    To Summarize – Tips for a Vegetarian Diet

    The National Institute of Health developed the following additional tips for a Vegetarian Diet.17

    1. Meet protein needs by eating a variety of plant foods, nuts, eggs or dairy foods.
    2. Snack on unsalted nuts and use them in salads or main dishes.
    3. Vitamin B12 is naturally found only in animal products. Choose fortified foods such as cereals or soy products, or take a vitamin B12 supplement if you don’t eat animal products.
    4. Get calcium from dairy products and calcium-fortified soy milk, breakfast cereals or orange juice.
    5. Beans and peas have many nutrients and are recommended for everyone, vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike. 

  • Section 4. Case Study Introduction

    Case Study Introduction

    Video Lecture #4 - Case Studies and Meal Planning


    In your practice there are a number of potential audiences for you to discuss the potential health benefits of Vegetarian Menu Planning:

    1. Adults – male or female
    2. Infants and Toddlers
    3. Teens
    4. Sports
    5. Vegan Nutrition in Pregnancy
    6. Seniors
    7. Other consideration for ethnic preferences or requirements

    Description of Learning Model

    Practice illustration examples are used to illustrate day-to-day performance of the competency. Case-based simulation is a technique in which a case is presented in a realistic manner, often including documents the practitioner would have in practice (such a referral forms, medical records, food diaries) followed by a series of questions about the case. An individual must decide the best courses of action based on information presented. The advantage of this approach is that it simulates real-life practice.

    You will be required to correctly answer each of the questions within the Case Studies in order to progress through the course. Once you have completed all the Case Study Questions and the course content you can print your Certificate.

  • Section 5. Case Study #1: Stanley K. - Weight Loss Objective

    Case Study #1 - Stanley K. - Weight Loss Objective

    Video Lecture #5 - Stanley K. Menu Planning 


    Introducing Stanley K.


    Stanley K. comes to see you for weight loss. He is not a vegan or vegetarian at this time but some of his co-workers have told him that he would lose weight if he became vegetarian.


    Stanley started to research this and became confused as to how to eat vegetarian, not be hungry and actually lose weight. He would like you to help him create a diet that will work for him.


    Initial Evaluation


    His initial evaluation with you indicates that he is a 46 year old male, 5’10”, 215 pounds. He has a wife and two children who are not vegetarian and have no plans for becoming vegetarian. Per Stanley’s doctor, his last labs were normal and he has no co-morbidities other than being overweight.


    You will be required to correctly answer each of the questions within the Case Studies in order to progress through the course. Once you have completed all the Case Study Questions and the course content you can print your Certificate.


    After completing the this Case Study, go to the "Section 6" in the Navigation Bar to continue through the course.

  • Section 6. Case Study #2: Karen L. - Maintaining a Healthy Diet

    Case Study #2 – Karen L. - Maintaining a Healthy Diet

    Video Lecture #6 – Karen L. Menu Planning

     

    Introducing Karen L.


    Karen is a 25 year old female, recently graduated from college and is looking for a job. She is coming to you because she has started feeling very tired all the time and has been having excessive bloating and gas with occasional abdominal pains. 


    Her primary care physician gave her a physical with basic labs but could not find anything wrong except for some minor anemia. He prescribed OTC iron pills and gas-x. He then suggested she see a dietitian since she is also slightly underweight.

     

    Karen tells you that she is lacto-ovo vegetarian. She has been practicing this since she started college and some of her friends were doing this. She has kept it up because it made her feel good and gave her lots of energy. She wants to continue this choice if she can.


    After completing this Case Study, go to the "Section 7" in the Navigation Bar to continue through the course.

  • Section 7. Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetics Practice Group

    Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetics Practice Group (VN DPG)

    The Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetics Practice Group (VN DPG) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics strives to empower members to be the leading authority on evidence-based vegetarian nutrition for food and nutrition professionals, health care practitioners and the public.

    As the leading authority on evidence-based vegetarian nutrition, the VN DPG vision is to optimize global health and well being by:

    • Creating and disseminating vegetarian nutrition educational materials
    • Supporting cutting edge research
    • Developing influential public policy

    The Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website is other source of information for you to reference. The website is designed to share information for all age groups, and fitness levels that will promote health and well-being based on the latest research.

    Visit the VN DPG website -  Click Here

    Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetics Practice Group Membership

    As a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics some of the benefits of joining the Dietetic Practice Group include:

    • Ready to print RD Resources to distribute to clients or use the professional RD resources for personal use. Member forums — a great way to connect with VN DPG members:

      • Request ideas for clients with special diet needs
      • Share latest research
      • Engage with vegetarian friendly professionals

    • Opportunities to share your passion for Vegetarian Nutrition through the State Coordinators Program at your affiliate annual meetings:

      • Scholarships available for presenting plant-based nutrition at your affiliate annual meetings
      • Set up networking events for VN DPG members
      • Promote VN DPG with an exhibit
      • Connect with Academy student members

    To become a member of the Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group - Click Here

    Vegetarian Newsletter

    Vegetarian Nutrition Update is the quarterly, 16-page newsletter published by the VNDPG and distributed free of charge to all VN members.

    For those who are not eligible for membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics but would like to subscribe to the VN newsletter, they may do so for $30 per year.

    The newsletter contains pertinent information to help with vegetarian clients and for personal enrichment which include:

    • feature articles directly applicable to all areas of dietetics practice
    • reviews of scientific literature on vegetarian related topics
    • CPE articles (1/year)
    • spotlight on members
    • key bibliography
    • book reviews for professional reference and books you can recommend to your clients
    • veggie bites
    • message from the chair
    • vegetarian dietitians in action
    • current news and events

    To view the newsletter enrollment form - Click Here  

  • Section 8. Print Your Certificate

    Once you have successfully completed both the Case Studies and the course materials you will have passed the course and can print your certificate. 

    After passing the course - Your certificate will be emailed to you and you can reprint your certificate at any time from the Certificate List on the right hand side bar.

    If you are a Florida Dietitian make sure that you have entered your Florida License number in your Profile. We will report your credits through CE Broker for the State of Florida.

  • Section 9. Additional Resources

    The following websites are available as additional resources for nutrition and health information for vegetarian diets.

     

    Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals with over 75,000 members. They publish online articles regarding vegetarian diets. Website


    MedlinePlus - U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health's Web site produced by the National Library of Medicine.  It is the world’s largest medical library providing information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues. Website


     U. S. Department of Agriculture

    The Food and Nutrition Information Center (FNIC) is a leader in on-line global nutrition information. Located at the National Agricultural Library (NAL).  The FNIC Web site contains over 2500 links to current and reliable nutrition information. Website

     

    U. S. Department of Agriculture

    The Food and Nutrition Information Center (FNIC) is a leader in on-line global nutrition information. Located at the National Agricultural Library (NAL).  The FNIC Web site contains over 2500 links to current and reliable nutrition information. Website


    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans is the Nation’s go-to source for nutrition advice. Published every 5 years for public health professionals, each edition of the Dietary Guidelines reflects the current body of nutrition science. These recommendations help Americans make healthy food and beverage choices and serve as the foundation for vital nutrition policies and programs across the United States. Website

     

    Vegetarian Resource Group

    The Vegetarian Resource Group (VRG) is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating the public on vegetarianism and veganism and the interrelated issues of health, nutrition, ecology, ethics, and world hunger. Website


    Vegetarian Times

    Vegetarian Times has been at the forefront of the healthy living movement, providing delicious recipes, expert wellness information and environmentally sound lifestyle solutions to a wide variety of individuals. They have a large collection of vegetarian recipes and online newsletters. Website

  • Section 10. About the Author

    Sharon Richmond - MBA, RD, LDN, CLT

    Registered and Licensed Dietitian, Certified LEAP Therapist.

    Sharon RichmondSharon is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian in Florida with a Certification in Adult Weight Management through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Additionally, she is a Certified LEAP Therapist ( CLT ) working with inflammation of the gut. She earned her MBA from Baruch College in New York prior to becoming a dietitian and has been working in the field of dietetics for 18 plus years. In her current practice she work with clients at her office as well as remotely.

    She started out as a clinical dietitian in New York where she worked with several hospitals and nursing homes. Her clinical experience included, but was not limited to general nutrition, oncology, renal and acute care. During that time Sharon supervised and managed a hospital kitchen, cafeteria and catering department.

    Upon moving to Tampa in 2001, she stayed with clinical dietetics and consulted in hospitals and nursing homes. From there, Sharon moved into a Regional position with the State and observed institutional kitchens, made recommendations on how to improve them, created menus, and worked with doctors to help them prescribe the correct diet for their patients. Since then, she has moved into private practice.

    Sharon is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Florida Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Tampa Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and several special interest groups involving nutrition.

  • Section 11. References

    [1] Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vegetarian Lifestyle [Website] Published February 05, 2014. Accessed November 8, 2015. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/vegetarian-lifestyle

    [2] NIH News in Health, Digging a Vegetarian Diet  [Website] Published July 2012. Accessed October 26, 2015. http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/jul2012/feature1

    [3] Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vegetarianism: The Basic Facts [Website] Published February 05, 2014. Accessed November 8, 2015. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/vegetarianism-the-basic-facts

    [4] NIH News in Health, Digging a Vegetarian Diet [Website] Published July 2012. Accessed November 16, 2015. http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/jul2012/feature1

    [5] Mayo Clinic, If I switch to a vegetarian diet, will I lose weight? [Website]  Accessed November 28, 2015.

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/vegetarian-diet/expert-answers/FAQ-20058298?p=1

    [6] NIH News in Health, Digging a Vegetarian Diet [Website] Published July 2012. Accessed November 16, 2015. http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/jul2012/feature1 

    [7] The Vegetarian Resource Group, The Market for Vegetarian Foods [Website] Accessed November 11, 2015. http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/market.htm#market

    [8] U.S. National Library of Medicine, Vegetarian Diet [Website] Updated July 28,2015. Accessed November 11, 2015. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002465.htm

    [9] NIH News in Health, Digging a Vegetarian Diet [Website] Published July 2012. Accessed November 16, 2015. http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/jul2012/feature1

    [10] United States Department of Agriculture, Health Eating Tips [Website] Accessed November 10, 2015. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy-eating-tips/tips-for-vegetarian.html

    [11]  NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine, Vegetarian Diet [Website] Updated July 28, 2015. November 11, 2015. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002465.htm

    [12] United States Department of Agriculture, Tips for Vegetarians [Website] http://www.choosemyplate.gov/tips-vegetarians. November 10, 2015.

    [13] NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine, Vegetarian Diet [Website] Accessed November 11. 2015. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002465.htm. Updated July 28, 2015.

    [14] United States Department of Agriculture, Healthy Eating for Vegetarians [Website] Accessed November 10, 2015. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/tips-vegetarians

    [15] United States Department of Agriculture, Health Eating Tips [Website] Accessed November 10, 2015. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy-eating-tips/tips-for-vegetarian.html.

    [16] Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Building a Healthy Vegetarian Meal: Myths and Facts [Website] Published January 28, 2014. Accessed November 25, 2015. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/building-a-healthy-vegetarian-meal-myths-and-facts

    [17] NIH News in Health, Digging a Vegetarian Diet [Website] Published July 2012. Accessed November 16, 2015. http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/jul2012/feature1